How Do You Use The Old Fashioned Oil Can Openers Four Facts About Recycling Plastic

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Four Facts About Recycling Plastic

Fact 1: In the United States alone, we consume more than two and a half million plastic bottles every hour. These are not just water bottles, but cleaning products, health products and other liquids, from motor oils and lubricants to milk and fruit juice bottles. Most of these bottles unfortunately end up being discarded.

Fact Two: Those plastic bags and tiny plastic rings that hold soda cans together can kill an estimated one million marine people every year because so much of our garbage is thrown into the ocean. The plastic is lightweight so it swims with them and they get caught or suffocate in it. It hurts so much, right?

Number three: We in the United States all throw away more than twenty-five billion worth of Styrofoam every year. This thing is inseparable.

Fact: To put it bluntly, our plastic recycling can use half as much energy as burning it. It also reduces the amount of toxic chemicals in the air from burning. Due to public awareness, in just nine years, between 1990 and 1999, the number of plastic processing companies increased by 80%. And they are new things around the world that are being built every year.

Since the middle of the 20th century, plastic has dominated the preferred material for use. It is inexpensive to produce, does not rust, can form all kinds of forms and is inseparable. Today we find it difficult to live without plastic. I dare you to take just five minutes and write down all the plastic bags in the room where you are. It can be done with an eye opener.

So yes, plastic recycling is very important.

The good news is that it is easier to process plastic. Most major urban areas have the capacity to process plastics. But you must remember to look for the recycling code in the triangle on your plastic and verify which numbers your community recycles. Not all plastics are recyclable. If it does not have a number in the embossed triangle at the bottom. Many microwave plastics are non-recyclable. You just have to train yourself to look for “bulges” before you throw. (And of course, wash it off before putting it in the trash). These numbers are the identification codes that allow the processor to know what kind of chemicals are in the plastic, how flexible it is, and so on. The most common plastics are called PET (like clear soda bottles) and less commonly seen through MDEP bottles (such as milk and laundry soap bottles). RecycleAbility has links that can help you determine which recyclable identification numbers are in your area.

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