Old Fashioned Terms For Speaking So On And So Forth Numbers in Filipino Part 1

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Numbers in Filipino Part 1

In Filipino, one can use English and Spanish numerals both in speaking and writing but never in formal (academic) subject writing. Here are the numbers in three languages ​​(note that I’m ordering them this way—Filipino, English, Spanish, and Spanish Filipino numbers):

  • Isa, one, uno, (same).
  • Dalawa, two, dos, (same).
  • Tatlo, three, tres, (same).
  • Apat, four, cuatro, quatro.
  • Lima, five, cinco, singko.
  • Anim, six, seis, sais.
  • Pito, seven, siete, siete.
  • Walo, eight, ocho, otso.
  • Siam, neh, nueve, nwebe.
  • Sampu, ten, diez, dyis.

As you can see, I have a fourth entry here which is the Filipino version of Spanish. Because Abakada (the Latin alphabet based on the Tagalog language) has removed some of the letters found in the Spanish alphabet. However, the Filipino language today has its own modern alphabet (which includes the letters, C, F, J, Q, V, X, Z) because of the need to use those letters to adapt to changes (without confusion due to limitations. In the old standard spelling. All the numbers given above can be used interchangeably. Note (the same) in the first three lines of the last column. The spelling is similar to the original. For numbers eleven through nineteen, simply put lips before the first nine numbers we discuss will make it Philippine numbers. The word lips received from him lips which means remains. That is, eleven in Filipino may be interpreted as the remainder of one and twelve, the remainder of two, and so on. For the Spanish and the Filipino version, I list them below. The format is Spanish, Philippized way

  • Once, one.
  • Case, case.
  • Trece, trese.
  • Catorce, catorce.
  • Clothes, clothes.
  • Dieciseis, dyesisais.
  • Diecisiete, dyesisiete.
  • Dieciocho, dyesiotso.
  • Diecinueve, dyesinweb.

For twenty, I’ll group it with the others ten. You will see that at the end of each number this MPU is attached. This can be interpreted as ten times the numbers from one to nine. Back to the Filipino word for ten, the prefix sam is actually the word isang derived from the word isa or one. This can be interpreted as multiplying one by ten or ten. The format is Filipino, Spanish and Filipino version.

  • Sampu, diez, dyis.
  • Dalawampu, veinte, bente.
  • Tatlompu, treinta, trenta.
  • Apatnapu, quarantine, quarantine.
  • Limampu, cincuenta, singkwenta.
  • Animnapu, sesenta, (same).
  • Pitompu, setenta, (same).
  • Walompu, ochenta, otsenta.
  • Siamnapu, noventa, noventa.

As I said before, the suffix pu represents ten, but what is the m before pu. This letter is actually the variable part na or ng. The sound changes depending on nearby sounds so don’t be confused by this. There are only four, sixty and ninety. Because before no, there is a consonant sound. /t/ and /m/ sounds. Like the rest, they all have vowel sounds so the m is added. As for ng, we will discuss this shortly. Let’s continue from twenty to twenty nine.

  • Dalawampu’t isa, veinteuno, benteuno.
  • Dalawampu’t dalawa, veintedos, bentedos.
  • Dalawampu’t tatlo, veintetres, bentetres.
  • Dalawampu’t apat, veintecuatro, bentekwatro.
  • Dalawampu’t lima, veintecinco, bentesingko.
  • Dalawampu’t anim, veinteseis, bentesais.
  • Dalawampu’t pito, veintesiete, bentesyete.
  • Dalawampu’t walo, veinteocho, benteotso.
  • Dalwampu’t siam, veintenueve, bentenwebe.

Notice the apostrophe? Here, for example, twenty-one can be twenty-one because that’s what ‘t really means in Filipino. Until ninety nine, this pattern is followed. For Spanish, let’s give another example to show clarity.

  • Treinta y uno, trentay uno.
  • Cuarenta y dos, quarantine dos.
  • Cincuenta y tres, singquentay tres.
  • Sesenta y cuatro, sesentay cuatro.
  • Setenta y cinco, setentay singko.
  • Ochenta y seis, otsentay sais.
  • Noventa y siete, nobentay siete.

Note that in the original, the numbers are expressed by three words and the y in the Filipino version is covered by the first word. Follow this example to use these Spanish numbers in Filipino style.

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