Old Fashioned Way To Make Coffee Using A Cloth Strainer Count’n Ounces and Treasure Hunting

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Count’n Ounces and Treasure Hunting

If there’s one thing I’ve learned, it’s the power of ‘Count’n Ounces’. In my previous life, I was on a plane going to “the moon” and when the time came… I jumped. I fell with a parachute. I fell with a reserve parachute. And, I threw in a backpack and LBE (Load Carrying Equipment… which is military jargon for canteen belt and breeches) that holds everything I’ll need on hand to do whatever I’m going to do in the field. Let’s not forget our weapons, ammunition and other ammunition. All told, everything I walked out the door on was 120-160 pounds…or even more. Thank God, the parachute did its job.

When I started my career, we had a bag called a “jungle bag”. It consisted of a tubular metal frame and a bag that held perhaps 1 ½ to 2 cubic meters of space. Not much space, considering everything we have to carry. On the frame (usually the top half) we would put a waterproof bag that carried the sleeping gear and maybe a few other things. Now for a soldier going into the field for 14-30 days, the first priority that goes through the rack is mission and critical equipment. For me, this means at least one heavy duty radio, lots of batteries (large batteries), antenna construction equipment (wires, insulators, coils, etc.), and a bunch of other miscellaneous stuff. Then came my share of other necessary team equipment.

After that, I can start looking for my needs. Food, clothing, shoes, bedding, “blue shoes” and the like. Each person had his standard list of personal items he carried. And what you got was as small and light as possible. You actually started ‘Count’n Ounces’ because you would carry every ounce you got. And if you can walk away and leave that extra gold behind, you did. Here’s an example: Back then, you were given one of two types of field rates: C-ration or LRRP. C-Rations were “liquid food”. It came in a box with cans of staple food, fruit, cake, bread, peanuts, peanut butter, whatever. Also a kit containing coffee, cream, salt, pepper, toilet paper and a few other things. A full C-Rat can weigh 2 to 2 ½ pounds. You can take the whole thing… or… you can break it down and take only what you want and leave the rest behind. And we did it. I couldn’t eat the box. Left behind. I didn’t want the creamer. went out Whatever was inside that box that I didn’t eat, I left behind. It might have been an ounce or two total, but that was the weight I had to carry. Everything was researched in this way. Perhaps the most valuable lesson I learned was the concept of “Dual Use”.

What is Dual Use? It’s a selection of things I brought with me that can be used for two or more tasks. Comfort, however humble, was important to us on the field. If you could carry something that had a dual use that also provided some means of comfort, it was worth its weight in gold. What is an example of a dual use item? A canteen cup. The old GI canteen cup was made of stainless steel, and in a shape that housed the canteen inside. It was relatively heavy, but you could heat food, drink coffee, build a shallow stream to put in the canteen (yes … we used iodine tablets to purify the water), boil water to sterilize medicine. instruments, gathering berries or other native foods, and the like. Another dual use item? Almost every man had a “drive-on-the-rag”. It was a triangular piece of cloth called a cravat, which he tied around his neck for warmth (when it was cold) or something hanging from it (like a spark plug) around his head to keep sweat out of his eyes (when it was hot). ), and use as a filter for insects and other waste from the water that is collected and poured into the canteen (from the canteen cup). A multi-purpose knife, like the Leatherman, was also popular. There was a knife, a window, a screwdriver, a hammer, even a saw. The parachute cord (aka 550 cord) was invaluable.

We had another saying, “Light of the journey – Frozen in the night”. Sleeping bags were heavy… especially when wet (Army seats are stuffed). It is better to take a poncho (nylon) and a light poncho (also nylon) and wrap in them at night. Not as hot, but not as heavy. The bag was a pillow. There is no tent. Instead, we used a second poncho attached to a 550 cord.

Time passed and the old forest ruck was retired and replaced by ALICE Ruck. A much bigger bag so we could carry more stuff. Eventually, it was replaced by what was called the LOWE Ruck. Even bigger, but also MUCH HEAVIER than ALICE’s woods or roots. We were also given a lot of equipment. Technology has reduced it, but 100 pounds of light equipment weighs as much as 100 pounds of heavy equipment. So, ‘Count’n Ounces’ was still the name of the game.

In future articles when I talk about specific planning for or conducting treasure hunting adventures, whether it’s metal detecting, gold panning, or anything else, I’ll give my “spin” on the supplies and equipment you should take. you In most cases, I would recommend something that is dual-use, or at least light weight, that works at the same time. I’m big on convenience, and part of that convenience is being able to get from point A to point B with all my “stuff” and not be so tired that I can’t do what I went there for. Until then, consider “Count’n Ounces” and start planning your next treasure hunting adventure.

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