Should You Use Bourbon Or Rye Whiskey In Old Fashioned Restaurant Cocktail Menu – World’s Best Food and Wine Combo

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Restaurant Cocktail Menu – World’s Best Food and Wine Combo

In all the world’s best looks, don’t get bogged down by the endless pairings possible with food and wine. I also have to leave my personal childhood favorite of Tom’s Peanut Butter Crackers and Coca Cola (a treat I still take on road trips). There is no doubt that a well-crafted Sazerac cocktail with freshly shucked oysters stands out as the best possible combination of food and drink in an epicurean world like The Colossus of Rhodes.

A complete history of the Sazerac Cocktail written by Chuck Taggart is well worth reading. I have confirmed the history from several other sources: the combination of these studies leads me to the conclusion that the Sazerac is America’s oldest cocktail. In the early 1800s, Antoine Amadie Peychaud, a New Orleans druggist, created a drink called a “coquertier” using his prescription Peychaud Bitters in cognac and Absinthe liquor. This French word was like “Cocktail” in America.

Mr. Taylor, owner of the Sazerac Coffee House, gave the name “Sazerac” in 1853 and announced that the drink would henceforth only be made from the Cognac brand, Sazerac-du-Forge et Fills. The Sazerac Brewery changed ownership in 1870 and with it, the base ingredient of the Sazerac, Cognac, changed to American Rye Whiskey for reasons of availability and cost.

My personal introduction to the Sazerac was not as a libretto, but in a story told to me by Marcelle Bienvenue, author of the cookbook Who’s Your Mama, Are You Catholic, and Can You Make a Roux,” in which she once craved a Sazerac. and shared oysters with Tennessee Williams at the Acme Oyster Bar in New Orleans. The story filled me with so much wonder that I started my New Orleans night solo determined to find the best Sazerac in the Cresant City.

This “hands on” research project continued well into the morning. All I can meaningfully report is that I survived – with an insatiable appetite for Sazeracs and fresh oysters.

About “well made” Sazeracs I need some mention here. If you are striving for “World’s Best”, wait until you have the right ingredients. Everyone knows the original absinthe made from wood, a substance that was then determined to be harmful to your health, was banned in the United States. That concept is now being tested, and you can scour the Internet and find Absinth again. I have not tried this as a substitute for Pernod. The New Orleans liqueur, Herbsaint, is almost exclusively used in my hometown, but I still prefer Pernod. You can substitute Canadian Rye, Bourbon or Cognac for American Rye, but I don’t. Last but not least, for Peychaud Bitters there is always Angostura Bitters, but why?

The World’s Best Food and Beverage Partner

Ingredients:

2 – 3 ½ ounce Old Fashioned Cocktail Glasses

5 – Drops of Pernod

1 – Sugar cube (Okay, fine – you can substitute a spoonful of sugar or syrup)

2 – Drops of Peychaud Bitters

1 ½ to 2 – Ounces of Old Overholt American Rye Whiskey (Come on! Go out and buy a bottle)

Crushed ice

1 – Large lemon zest (Make sure it’s big enough to squeeze some lemon juice)

12 – Any ultra fresh blue point oysters

Preparation:

Sazerac:

Fill glass number 1 with ice to chill

Add two drops of Peychaud Bitters to the sugar cube and pour into glass No.2

Add the Old Overholt whiskey and crush the sugar cube until it is completely crushed.

Add the ice cream and beat or stir until the sugar is completely dissolved.

Remove the ice from glass No.1 and dry it.

Add 5 drops of Pernod to Glass No 1, swirling it around until all surfaces are covered.

Take out the excess Pernod with a wrist screw (It’s all in the wrist action)

Glass No. 2 with glass No. 1

Stir in the lemon wedges until the oil is reduced, then as a garnish.

Oysters

Open, remove from the shell, and show on the bed of ice.

Go to Heaven! Sazerac heat has layers of complexity, including spiced honey and anise with a hint of lemon oil. A balance of sweet and spicy with pepper in a way that makes you long for solitude, where you can whine to your heart’s content without anyone saying, “I want what he’s having.”

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